Menu

Javascript is not activated in your browser. This website needs javascript activated to work properly.
You are here

Solar and geomagnetic dynamics

NEEM
NEEM field station on Greenland, 2009.

 

Solar and geomagnetic dynamics

Our research within cosmogenic radionuclides (e.g. 14C and 10Be) encompasses many different aspects of solar system and Earth sciences that range from heliospheric and geomagnetic modulation of cosmic rays, solar eruptions and solar variability to sun-climate interactions, carbon cycle investigations and climate studies. We perform world-leading research on cosmogenic radionuclide records through broad national and international collaboration, and this theme can be expected to prosper over the coming years following a large six-year grant from the Swedish Research Council. This will allow us to start new and innovative studies on solar activity reconstructions and their extension back in time. Another focus will be investigations of the relationship between solar activity and climate change. This will lead to a better understanding of a possibly underestimated factor in climate change, and could lead to enhanced predictions of future climate change. In addition, we are involved in cosmogenic radionuclide-based dating of sediments and other geological archives, e.g. estimating the age of the Greenland ice sheet. Our research is embedded in the Linnaeus Centre LUCCI, which focusses on carbon cycle-climate interactions and the strategic research initiative MERGE on climate modelling. Furthermore, it will benefit from the recent strengthening of the climate modelling competence and it exploits the potential of the 14C dating laboratory at the Department. The research on geomagnetic field changes in connection to our palaeomagnetic laboratory is an important key to the future success of this research area.

Page Manager:

Latest Articles

Solar forcing of Holocene summer sea-surface temperatures in the northern North Atlantic: Jiang et al. Geology 2015

Post-depositional remanent magnetization lock-in depth in precisely dated varved sediments assessed by archaeomagnetic field models: Mellström et al., EPSL 2015

Assessing the differences between the IntCal and Greenland ice-core time scales for the last 14,000 years via the common cosmogenic radionuclide variations: Muscheler et al. QSR 2014

Reconstructing Holocene geomagnetic field variation: new methods, models and implications: Nilsson et al. GJI 2014